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Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

2 edition of eastern larch beetle in Alaska found in the catalog.

eastern larch beetle in Alaska

Richard A. Werner

eastern larch beetle in Alaska

by Richard A. Werner

  • 172 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station in Portland, Or .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Beetles -- Alaska,
  • Trees -- Diseases and pests -- Alaska

  • Edition Notes

    StatementRichard A. Werner
    SeriesResearch paper PNW -- 357
    ContributionsPacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination13 p. :
    Number of Pages13
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13565491M

    Eastern Larch Beetle () When under attack from pests a deciduous conifer can often drop its needles and grow a new set, which is "a great way to get rid of pests," Aukema said. More information about Alaskan Larch may be found here.. The Larix Laricina is commonly known as the Alaskan Larch, American Larch, Eastern Larch, Hackmatack, Tamarack as well as Tamarack Larch.. The currently accepted scientific name of tamarack is Larix laricina (Du Roi) K. Koch. The genus Larix consists of 10 species of deciduous, coniferous trees found in cool, temperate regions of the.

    Douglas-fir beetle Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Pseudotsuga menziesii eastern larch beetle D. simplex Larix laricina fir engraver Scolytus ventralis Abies concolor, A. grandis, A. magnifica Jeffrey pine beetle D. jeffreyi P. jeffreyi mountain pine beetle* D. ponderosae P. albicaulis, P. contorta, P. flexilis, P. lambertiana, P. monticola, P. ponderosa. Effects on eastern larch beetle of its natural attractant and synthetic pheromones in Alaska / ([Portland, Or.?]: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, []), by Richard A. Werner and Or.) Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland (page images at HathiTrust).

      A close up photo of an eastern larch bark beetle gnawing through wood. The beetle is only about 4 mm long. Individually they cannot harm a tree, but collectively they have killed , acres of. Other Common Names/Trade Names: Tamarack Scientific Name: Larix laricina Best Characteristics for Identification: Lustrous. Very dense, obvious latewood. Resin canals. Uses: Local use lumber, pulp. General Natural Range: A transcontinental species extending from the northern tree line from Alaska to Newfoundland south into New England and the Lake States.


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Eastern larch beetle in Alaska by Richard A. Werner Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genre/Form: book: Additional Physical Format: Print version: Werner, Richard A. (Richard Allen), Eastern larch beetle in Alaska. [Portland, Or.]. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Werner, Richard A. (Richard Allen), Eastern larch beetle in Alaska. [Portland, Or.]: U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture. The eastern larch beetle in Alaska / Related Titles. Series: Research paper PNW ; By. Werner, Richard A. (Richard Allen), Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.) Type. Book Material. Published material. Publication info. The eastern larch beetle in Alaska (Research paper PNW) [Richard A Werner] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Richard A Werner.

A swath of Minnesota's forest heavily impacted by eastern larch beetle. Photo by Marc Roberts, USDA Forest Service. Eastern larch beetle (ELB) is a native bark beetle infesting tamarack (eastern larch) at unprecedented levels throughout the tree's range.

Adults emerge in late spring and bore into the trunk to feed, mate, and lay eggs. The current outbreak of eastern larch beetle in northern Minnesota is going into its 18th year, and researchers have found that at least some eastern larch beetles are able to reach maturity without requiring an overwintering period.

In short, warmer winters mean eastern larch beetle is killing trees faster than it can be managed. Eastern larch beetle-Management Tamarack infested with eastern larch beetles appear red.

The current outbreak cannot currently be managed on a landscape level due to the abundance of beetles, ecologically sensitive nature of most tamarack stands, unpredictable site accessibility for logging equipment, and poor markets for tamarack lumber.

The eastern larch beetle in Alaska by Werner, Richard A. (Richard Allen), Topics Beetles Alaska, Trees Diseases and pests Alaska Publisher [Portland, Or.]: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station This book is available with additional data at Biodiversity Heritage Library.

Effects on eastern larch beetle of its natural attractant and synthetic pheromones in Alaska / Related Titles. Series: Research note PNW ; By. Werner, Richard A. (Richard Allen), Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.) Type.

Book. American larch, eastern larch, Alaska larch, hackmatack Uses The commercial value of tamarack wood is limited because of insect and disease problems and its relatively poor pulping properties.

The wood is used principally for pulp products, especially the transparent paper in window envelopes, but slow-File Size: 95KB. Effects on Eastern Larch Beetle of Its Natural Attractant and Synthetic Pheromones in Alaska (Classic Reprint) [Richard Allen Werner] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Excerpt from Effects on Eastern Larch Beetle of Its Natural Attractant and Synthetic Pheromones in Alaska This publication reports research involving by: 4. An eastern larch beetle infestation can be recognized by the presence on the trunk of long flows of resin and dark brown boring dust from the galleries excavated by the larvae and adults.

During severe attacks, the numerous galleries excavated under the bark can disrupt sap flow, eventually causing the tree to become desiccated and die within. The eastern larch beetle, Dendroctonus simplex LeConte (Coleoptera: Sco!ytidae), occurs throughout the natural range of tamarack, Larix: laricina, its principal host, from Newfoundland and the northeastern United States to British Columbia and Alaska (WoodCited by: The eastern larch beetle is a native North American bark beetle that occurs throughout the range of its principle host, tamarack.

It is generally a secondary pest attacking stressed trees, but when outbreaks occur, healthy trees are also attacked. DISTRIBUTION. In Canada, the eastern larch beetle occurs in every province, plus Yukon and NorthwestFile Size: KB.

The seasonal development of the eastern larch beetle is shown in figure 2. One generation a year is produced by the eastern larch beetle in Alaska. Simpson () reports that as many as three broods were produced in New Brunswick in Prebble () states that.

The eastern larch beetle, D. simplex LeConte, occurs in the Northeastern States south to West Virginia and west to Minnesota.

It also occurs from coast to coast in Canada and northwestward to Alaska. Its preferred host is tamarack but it has also been recorded from red spruce.

The larch beetle is just the latest critter to threaten Minnesota trees. There have been recent outbreaks of native insect pests like pine bark beetles and jackpine budworms in the state.

Effects on eastern larch beetle of its natural attractant and synthetic pheromones in Alaska by Werner, Richard A. (Richard Allen), ; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.)Pages: Eastern Larch Beetle.

Eastern larch beetle (ELB), Dendroctonus. simplex, impacted stands of tamarack (Larix laricina) in the south-central areas of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula in Most of the tamarack trees in impacted stands were killed. The level of impact tends to progress from some tree mortality in small pockets along stand edges.

Diana L. Six, Ryan Bracewell, in Bark Beetles, Dendroctonus simplex LeConte (Eastern Larch Beetle). This beetle can be found throughout the range of its host from Alaska, across Canada and into the north central and northeastern USA (Wood, ).It colonizes the main bole and exposed roots of standing Larix laricina (Du Roi) K.

Koch or, less commonly, windthrow and logging slash. Re: Loss of our Tamarack (Eastern Larch) «Reply #17 on: SeptemAM» Actually, the turn in conversation about this seems to be a bit out of place because in this instance, the larch beetle is a native North American Insect.Index of all insects found in Alaska.

Note: Please note that insects do not adhere to man-drawn borders on a map and as such they may be found beyond their listed 'reach' showcased on our website.

Insects are typically drawn to a given area by available food supply, weather, environmental factors (pollution, etc), water supply, mating patterns, etc and can be territorial. im trying to find out the identification of a beetle in Alaska, I have been looking for awhile, its oval, about a 1/4 inch at most.

black, and a wide light tan stripe on its back, short ant too. I was thinking it was a foreign grain beetle of some sort. any help would be appreciated. thanks heather.